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Prey selection by anApex predator: the importance of sampling uncertainty

Davis, Miranda L. and Stephens, Philip A. and Willis, Stephen G. and Bassi, Elena and Marcon, Andrea and Donaggio, Emanuela and Capitani, Claudia and Apollonio, Marco (2012) Prey selection by anApex predator: the importance of sampling uncertainty. PLoS One, Vol. 7 (10), e47894. ISSN 1932-6203. Article.

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DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047894

Abstract

The impact of predation on prey populations has long been a focus of ecologists, but a firm understanding of the factors influencing prey selection, a key predictor of that impact, remains elusive. High levels of variability observed in prey selection may reflect true differences in the ecology of different communities but might also reflect a failure to deal adequately with uncertainties in the underlying data. Indeed, our review showed that less than 10% of studies of European wolf predation accounted for sampling uncertainty. Here, we relate annual variability in wolf diet to prey availability and examine temporal patterns in prey selection; in particular, we identify how considering uncertainty alters conclusions regarding prey selection. Over nine years, we collected 1,974 wolf scats and conducted drive censuses of ungulates in Alpe di Catenaia, Italy. We bootstrapped scat and census data within years to construct confidence intervals around estimates of prey use, availability and selection. Wolf diet was dominated by boar (61.5±3.90 [SE] % of biomass eaten) and roe deer (33.7±3.61%). Temporal patterns of prey densities revealed that the proportion of roe deer in wolf diet peaked when boar densities were low, not when roe deer densities were highest. Considering only the two dominant prey types, Manly's standardized selection index using all data across years indicated selection for boar (mean = 0.73±0.023). However, sampling error resulted in wide confidence intervals around estimates of prey selection. Thus, despite considerable variation in yearly estimates, confidence intervals for all years overlapped. Failing to consider such uncertainty could lead erroneously to the assumption of differences in prey selection among years. This study highlights the importance of considering temporal variation in relative prey availability and accounting for sampling uncertainty when interpreting the results of dietary studies.

Item Type:Article
ID Code:8097
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords:Prey populations, predation, wolf, dietary studies
Subjects:Area 05 - Scienze biologiche > BIO/05 Zoologia
Divisions:001 Università di Sassari > 01-a Nuovi Dipartimenti dal 2012 > Scienze della Natura e del Territorio
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
Copyright Holders:© 2012 Davis et al.
Deposited On:31 Oct 2012 17:24

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